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Another great Trek episode… (slight spoiler alert)

Image – Wikipedia (Star Trek Franchise is pretty strict about sharing images, so it’s hard to find copyright free ones for blogging)

Caught season 1 episode 3 of the new Star Trek TV series last night. I felt this one would indicate if the show was heading somewhere or just going to fizzle, as did Star Trek Enterprise.

Pleasantly surprised again.

The best part, I thought, was how the quirky Captain of Discovery tells Michael Burnham that universal rules are for the rank and file. Kings appreciate the importance of context.

Of course, he could have said Queens appreciate context—that is, they bend Starfleet regulations. And given that the show is trying to be so forward thinking by giving the woman Michael a male name, I thought this was a small glitch.

But other than that… looking forward to the remainder of the season!

 6 ‘Star Trek’ Captains, Ranked from Worst to Best (space.com)

 Claire Foy auditioned for ‘The Crown’ wearing a tiara, gloves, and gown while she was 6 months pregnant (businessinsider.com)

 The man behind ‘Game of Thrones’ has several TV shows in the works – here’s everything you need to know about them (businessinsider.com)

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Star Trek Discovery seems on track

Managed to catch the first two episodes without ads, thanks to our PVR. It took a little juggling because the show started late. Luckily I taped every instance on every channel..

So how was it?

Good. I was pleasantly surprised. I like female lead characters and Michael Burnham is stellar. “Michael” is a woman, btw. I thought that was an interesting twist, given all the transgender news and remaining biases around sex role stereotypes.

It’s also my name!

I’m just wondering if Discovery will continue strong or fizzle out like Star Trek Enterprise.

Another reviewer at Now Magazine thought the Klingon scenes were a bit hokey and overdone. I can see that. I never really liked the complex Klingon culture story line in Trek spinoffs.

But we’ll see. I enjoyed the first two episodes.

Now that I’ve finished the entire Vikings series, I’ve been feeling a lack of something to watch. Something engaging.

I need my sci-fi fix and when there’s no good sci-fi around, life gets dull.

Ahead… warp factor two!


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Beyond the neutral zone


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Getting Back to Bach

Trelane - with harpsichord (under his arm...)

Trelane – with harpsichord (under his arm…) – via startrek.com

Years ago I went through a major J. S. Bach phase. Especially Bach harpsichord. There was something trippy about those tinkly keys. They literally transported me back into some Gothic drawing room. (Even as a kid I loved the Star Trek TOS episode with Trelane, a spoiled brat alien harpsichordist who had to grow up and be mature.)

So I ordered every CD I could get my hands on through the library. I drove to Bach. I worked to Bach. I played to Bach. I even made a video or two with Bach.

Then I lost it. I had to move on and explore other genres and different types of classical music. But as the world turns and the planets revolve around the sun, I guess it was only a matter of time before I came back to Bach. And why not? Along with Mozart and Beethoven, he’s one of those guys who just always gets it right.

Listening to this right now through our library. Good!


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Star Trek Memories – Thanks Spock!

Vulcan (Star Trek)

Vulcan (Star Trek) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Born in 1962, I was almost too young to really appreciate Star Trek by the time it had run its course from 1966-69. Seven years old, and Star Trek had been cancelled.

My first memories of watching Star Trek are in the basement on Saturdays. It might have been a black and white or maybe a fairly primitive color TV. I can’t remember. What I do remember, though, is that the picture was pretty snowy. So it could have been a Buffalo NY channel. Or possibly a Hamilton ON channel. A snowy picture wasn’t uncommon back in the 60s and early 70s—if a household didn’t have cable, that is.

Even though the picture was fuzzy, I was captivated by Trek‘s faraway ambiance. It was low tech, for sure. But very high on the imagination. And that’s what really counts in storytelling, sci-fi or otherwise.

A few years later, the show came back as daily reruns. My friends and I would watch Trek, almost like an after school congregation. Sometimes we’d watch two episodes a day. The reruns were that popular.

Star Trek – “City on the Edge of Forever” – via Wikipedia

One of my favorite childhood episodes took place on a planet similar to Nazi Germany. Another great episode saw Kirk being accused of witchcraft on a planet similar to Earth’s European Middle Ages. And then there was Trelane, that Renaissance spoilsport who played the harpsichord, mostly concerned with his own pleasure.

There are several other outstanding episodes. Some explore the notion of parallel universes. Others, the merging of fantasy and reality. And others, the pitfalls of gangland violence or hippie idealism. But my all-time favorite, “City on the Edge of Forever,” won a Hugo award.

In this episode, Kirk, Spock and Dr. McCoy (Bones) travel back in time through a doughnut shaped portal to America’s Dirty Thirties. Kirk falls in love with the beautiful and insightful Edith Keeler. Unfortunately, she dies at the end of the episode. So Kirk must return to the Enterprise, to his own time, and suppress his feelings in order to command the starship.

It was a brilliant episode about time travel. One of the first to blend metaphysics and human emotion.

English: Jolene Blalock in Cairo

Jolene Blalock in Cairo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As for Leonard Nimoy, he was forever clever, funny and played the role of Spock perfectly. Jolene Blalock, who expertly portrayed the Vulcan T’Pol in Enterprise, once said that Nimoy was a hard act to follow.

Spock was groundbreaking because he was, perhaps, the first ET on TV with a full personality. As a self-proclaimed Vulcan, he was also half-human, a being who’d been taught as a boy to bury his emotions. That’s what Vulcans did. But the inner conflict was always lurking, just waiting to rise to the surface.

Despite his apparent rationalism, Spock would fall in love. He’d be reckless. He’d exhibit great valor. And when teased by Bones and Kirk, Spock would coolly rationalize his underlying emotionalism, in true Vulcan style.

Nimoy certainly was the man for the job. He played the innovative, complex character of Spock to a T. So Mr. Nimoy, thanks for the memories. And to you in the next life:

LIVE LONG AND PROSPER!  🙂


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Star Trek, to boldly go where no “one” has gone before…

Star Trek, to boldly go where no “one” has gone before…, Photo copyright © hilllisa23, 2009. All rights reserved.

The New Star Trek movie is on it’s way… warp factor 8 !

Thanks to hilllisa23 for permission to post photo.


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Star Wars according to a 3 year old

Star Wars according to a 3 year old.

I recently watched the original Star Wars (1977, enhanced edition) for the umpteenth time and was struck by two things–first how groundbreaking it was and, second, how some of the inside sets/scenes seemed to be influenced by Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey and to some degree Roddenberry’s Star Trek.

Likewise, it seems that the hanger scenes in Battlestar Galactica-Reimagined (BSG fans are gearing up for the fourth and final season starting in April) borrow from the rebel hanger scenes in Star Wars.

This all reminds me of those culturally backward folks who sniff and snort at the suggestion that sci-fi is myth that builds on myth not unlike any other myth. Why is it so hard for some people to get this? Minds locked in the past…?