Just my stuff

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Reelin’ in the Years – 1996

Liam Gallagher of Oasis performing at a concer...

Liam Gallagher of Oasis performing at a concert in San Diego, 2005. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It’s 1996 and I’m 34 years old. ’96 is an awful year for music. At least for me. There’s a whole bunch of IMO second rate bands pumping out lousy rock that the kids of that era seem to really love.

These bands didn’t grab my attention. So was I just becoming an old fart, out of touch with the scene or could I simply discern that the music was crap?

Well, the success of these bands seemed short lived and today they’re mostly forgotten. So I tend to go with the “just crap” hypothesis.

The Beatles (sort of) released the Lennon post-mortem reconstruction of “Free as a Bird.” I remember hearing that and feeling some nostalgia but also that it wasn’t quite right. Proof positive that Elton John and Bernie Taupin were wise to say:

And you can’t go back and if you try it fails ~ The Captain and the Kid

No Doubt released Tragic Kingdom which I enjoyed at the time but not so much today. And Oasis had a hit with “Wonderwall”—another one I liked then but not so much now. Listening to that tune last night I was amazed at how Liam Gallagher’s vocals ingloriously drift off-key when he holds a note.

Image via musicdirect.com – Fair Use / Fair Dealing rationale

Yes, I understand that “detune” is cool in EDM but was he doing that on purpose or is he just a crummy singer? I guess a hit is a hit. So he must have known what he was doing. And as I say, I liked it when I was younger.

I don’t remember too much from my personal life for ’96. Probably just working my butt off on the Ph.D., a few friendly and romantic dates here and there, and taking long walks, checking out Ottawa mostly on foot.

I do remember talking to a lot of street people and watching their natural progression from say, just losing their apartment to becoming homeless babes in the urban woods.

I learned a lot from talking with those street people—musicians, drifters, and drinkers, alike.

It was sad and I sometimes tried to help. But after getting scammed by one operator I started giving less and less, with a few exceptions. I guess what I learned most from my long interactive walks is that street people are individuals just like anyone else. No stereotypes really apply to any of them.

The shield from the Coat of arms of Canada. Th...

The shield from the Coat of arms of Canada. The shield was created by a Royal Warrant in 1921, thus out of Canadian Copyright. http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/ceem-cced/symbl/arm1-eng.cfm (Wikipedia)

Anyhow, my fav song for ’96 wasn’t an obvious choice. I really only recall the hook when Gord Downie of The Tragically Hip sings “You are ahead by a century…”

Gord Downie is a hero in Canada. A very brave guy. With terminal brain cancer, he kept performing and advocating for Canada’s First Nations communities, trying to shed some light on one of Canada’s dirty little secrets.

Personally, I think there are more dirty little secrets in Canada. But only time can bring those to light.

Don’t get me wrong. I love my country. But I look at it as a physician would look upon a desperately sick nation. No cure without first identifying the disease.

So with that said, hats off to Gord Downie, a great Canadian in line with other heroes like Terry Fox and all those who sacrificed their lives or health in the line of military duty, fighting to ensure our country remains “The True North Strong and Free.”

Reelin’ in ALL the Years

 Liam Gallagher On Noel’s Wife: “She’s The Reason Oasis Is No Longer” (stereogum.com)

 North Korean Figure Skaters Make Olympic Debut, To Cheers (gpbnews.org)

 Music icon Quincy Jones says Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen can play guitar ‘just like’ Jimi Hendrix (businessinsider.com)


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Google Street View – What is Big Brother Watching?

My screen capture of Google Street View – Click on image for full size. Follow this link for “live” travel and image credit >> https://goo.gl/maps/ZVjnLLMNHPJ2

Web cams in public spaces are a fact of life. Also, individuals with video-equipped phones have changed our way of life. In a nutshell, abusive people can’t get away with what they used to get away with, because chances are they’ll be videoed and perhaps charged.

That’s the plus side.

The down side, detractors say, is that we lose some degree of our human rights and freedoms. Supporters will rejoinder that public cams enhance human rights, because nobody has the right to harm another or trangsress their right to live in peace.

This debate has been going on for decades. In its political form, probably for centuries.

I first read about it in Zygmunt Bauman’s book, Socialism The Active Utopia. But subconsciously I’ve been aware of it since my teens. Power, government, freedom. It’s a delicate balance.

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let freedom reign – take 2


So, basically the same mix as the first take posted yesterday, but the trance synth level is elevated a bit, and all effects are removed from the drum tracks (well, except for the glitch track, but that will stay). Net result should be a cleaner rhythm track.. I’ll probably do one more version with a bit of reverb on the drums, and then choose the best one for MLK day, coming soon!

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Review – The Truth Injection: More New World Order Exposed (DVD)

Reality Films

This review also appears at Earthpages.org

Did you get your flu shot this year?

Every fall, scores of people rush off to the doctor for a vaccine that scientists admit is based on inexact science.

The reality of several different hardy and adaptable flu viruses makes it difficult to predict which will be dominant for a given year.

At least, that’s the official story.

The Truth Injection tells quite another story, one full of politics, intrigue and allegations of brash moneymaking.

The film kicks off with a controversial music video by Trillion and a vintage CBC news broadcast about the failure of the Swine Flu to materialize in 1976.

It then moves into the main feature, which is a detailed presentation given by Ian R. Crane at Glastonbury in 2009.

For those under the impression that things aren’t always what they seem, Crane’s talk provides more than enough food for thought. In fact, at times the film comes off as a media blitz. However, Crane encourages his live audience to check instead of uncritically accepting his claims.

Not unlike a Michael Moore film, Crane weaves an intricate conspiratorial web where major political players keep cropping up over the decades, apparently with one thing in mind: making money. Well, that and keeping the masses deceived, disempowered and in a ‘state of fear,’ as it were, through propaganda.

Crane says most of us are too apathetic and willfully ignorant because it’s easier to play the proverbial game than risk the repercussions of stepping out of line.

And he believes it doesn’t stop there. The common person isn’t just bullied, pushed around and cheated by politico-corporate heavyweights. Our very lives could be endangered by, ironically, the same thing that law enforcement officers work tirelessly to eradicate–namely, drugs.

But these potentially debilitating and, perhaps, lethal drugs aren’t smuggled inside stereo speakers, spare tires or through some other wily means of getting past legal check points. Nope. According to Crane they’re passed through a long and costly process of certification that only the biggest players can afford.

While allegations of collusion between so-called Big Pharma and some psychiatrists certainly have surfaced, it seems that Crane’s argument goes well beyond a few isolated cases of rule breaking.

For Crane, there’s an all-out conspiracy infiltrating the system and the handful of individuals driving this disturbing global agenda are tagged as “sociopaths” and “psychopaths.”

Pretty strong stuff.

This outlook arguably could give the benefit of the doubt a bit more. True, only a naïve person would see politics as pristine. But to assume that the major players are chiefly concerned with power and greenbacks might reduce a complicated dynamic to an unduly simplistic one.

Thankfully, Crane’s solution to the present world disorder doesn’t call for more environmentally polluting drugs. Instead, and with the Mayan prophecies of a new world cycle for 2012 just around the corner, the film advocates a combination of self-knowledge and responsible action.

By holistically “being and doing,” Crane says we can surmount all the rot that threatens both personal happiness and collective survival.

If politics is a game of socially constructed truth and power, The Truth Injection says it’s time for the ordinary person to rise up and participate rather than simply cheer or boo from the sidelines.

A nice idea, to be sure. Whether or not it will ever happen is another issue, altogether.