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Reelin’ in the Years – 1993

Image Wikipedia

It’s 1993 and I’m 31 years old. Looking at the charts I almost gave up on posting a favorite song for this year, the music is so lackluster. There are a lot of okay songs from older acts on the way out and from promising younger artists not fully matured.

I don’t know if this is my favorite for ’93 but I remember liking it. I’ve searched for “Suffer” on YouTube over the past few years with no luck. Just found it now. Hopefully, it won’t be pulled too soon.

The song seems to be about seeing through and closing the door on manipulative spiritual figures who love playing head trips on vulnerable people for money, power, and self-aggrandizement. This could apply to bad apples in any religion or organization.

Watch out, seekers! Don’t forget what Annie Lennox said in 1983.

David Bowie also released a 2CD retrospective, “The Singles” in ’93.

Pretty much all the songs are good. I remember buying it downtown on Yonge Street (in TO) and thinking it was a nice deal. This was just before the internet took off so having all these Bowie tunes in one collection seemed an attractive option.

Image Wikipedia

I’m converting to Christianity in ’93 after dabbling in just about every spiritual path known to mankind. Soon I’m going to immerse myself in Gregorian chants and choral music, still keeping an eye on pop but putting it on the back burner.

’93 was the year I took down all my Hindu, Buddhist and New Age icons and put up Catholic images and symbols in their place. I’ve never really turned back. Although these days I’m not quite so iconoclastic.

I do not believe all paths are the same. But from my experience, they do seem to work together when all parties are sincere and respect proper boundaries.

Most of Earthpages.ca is dedicated to explaining my beliefs on spirituality so I won’t elaborate here.

Reelin’ in ALL the Years

 Katherine Jenkins – she’s gone up an octave (slippedisc.com)

 Dressing David Bowie As ‘Ziggy Stardust’ (thecut.com)

 Elon Musk’s ‘Starman’ is our new space hero (mashable.com)

 Watch Japan’s ice skating team dance to Ryuichi Sakamoto (thefader.com)

 What reviewers are saying about Apple HomePod (bostonherald.com)

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Reelin’ in the Years – 1992

It’s 1992 and I’m 30 years old. Bye bye youth. Hello, old age. That’s sort of how I felt. Also, that I had to smarten up and start being mature because, well, 30 is 30.

What a joke. I still had so much to learn.

Image – Wikipedia

At the beginning of the Ph.D. program in Ottawa, I’m wondering how to focus my thesis. I remember buying a huge thesaurus that, for the time, was really quite good. I felt armed and ready to go. Well, almost.

Romantically, the summer of ’92 saw me at the climax of a platonic but powerful long-distance relationship. Something like the Tristan and Isolde romance that Joseph Campbell talks about. Courtly, archetypally inspired love nurtured through old-fashioned, snail mail letters. We were engaged to be wed for a short while but, just before my studies began, it all ended with the stroke of a pen.

Tristan and Isolde

Tristan and Isolde (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Before it was over, I was happy. Admittedly, I wondered how it could work with her being in another country.

But when you’re in love, especially that kind of romantic archetypal love, practicalities come second. You just love to dream about your beloved as thoughts reach across the sky like rainbows and your souls feel almost cosmically connected.

So I was thinking it’s sort of ironic that my favorite tune for 1991 was “One” and for 1992 “The One.” The first is about agape or brotherly and sisterly love, the second is about eros or romantic love. I believe both types of love could be aligned and are not mutually exclusive. And some advanced mystical saints actually combine them in their devotion to the deity.

For me, this is one of Elton’s last good tunes before “The Circle of Life” (2004) and “The Captain and the Kid” (2006). So I dedicate it to a lost love that wasn’t meant to be but which brings sublime memories of my first entirely spiritual romance sans borders.

And all I ever needed was the one
Like freedom fields where wild horses run
When stars collide like you and I
No shadows block the sun
You’re all I’ve ever needed
Baby you’re the one

Reelin’ in ALL the Years

 Sir Elton John to retire from touring after almost 50 years (pinknews.co.uk)

 Elton John adds one last Michigan concert to his farewell tour (mlive.com)

 Hearts that are Puzzled (wateringcanblog.com)

 This romantic teen movie is breaking boundaries by having 15 different actors play a single love interest (businessinsider.com)

 We asked and you answered: Here are your top stories about falling in (and out) of love in the office (businessinsider.com)

 Why Do We Fall in Love? Science Can Explain (greatist.com)

 Beware, online daters: Looking for love, you could end scammed instead (bostonherald.com)

 The 7 most romantic places in the world, according to Hollywood movies – from Manhattan to Berlin (businessinsider.com)

 Top 5 Modern Romance Novels Adapted Into Movies (ltdcommodities.com)


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It’s Saturday, a lovely day and I’m writing about dreams…


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Me before my coffee

This may seem a joke but seriously, coffee really helps me to rise above some of the creepy stuff lurking in the so-called collective unconscious.

Image via Tumblr

Image via Tumblr


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Trying to be a good Catholic – I did an experiment, here’s the results

Follow the Star by MC via Flickr

Follow the Star by MC via Flickr

Ever since I converted to Catholicism back in 2001, I found it was a two-sided experience. I had been going through a challenging time after living in India for a couple of years. The West seemed strange, and I learned what they mean by the term, reverse culture shock.

Some people take their hard shell selves with them when they travel. And they return home as if they’d just watched a nice slide show. They know a little more about the world but remain fundamentally unchanged. Not so with me. I was going through a tremendous time of transition. So I was soaking up Indian ways – and vibes – more than most.

I was very open. This openness and sensitivity is a good thing. But I needed something to get me back to my truest self. My core.

Funnily enough, as a former Protestant who never went to church growing up, I found that Catholicism was the path that brought me back to myself. Not just to my Western ego. For me, that’s necessary but secondary. No, I mean my genuine, created self. The one who stands before God in humility and full realization of his human imperfection.

So all fine and dandy, right? I found my spiritual home after years of searching. And I didn’t have to travel miles and miles to exotic lands to feel well. Catholic churches are ubiquitous. In fact, where I live, I tend to rotate among seven, all within about 15 minutes of home. A taste of heaven in 15 minutes. Not bad.

So what’s the problem? Is there a problem?

Well, yes and no.

No, if I keep rotating and don’t get too invested in any single parish. Yes, if I try to be like regular churchgoers.

Image via Tumblr

Image via Tumblr

I’m sure a mean-spirited psychiatrist would have a field day with that. “He cannot settle down in any one parish. He needs to constantly escape to feel anonymous,” etc. etc.

But it’s really not that simple. And I think some people just don’t get why I have to do Catholicism my own way.

It gets back to my sensitivity. In any parish there is good and not so good. There are nice and not so nice people. There are priests who seem en route to heaven and others who might be in for a rude surprise when they die.

And I tend to sense vibes from all of this. Not just the heavenly graces, but also the very real human stuff. It’s always a balancing act. If I frequent one parish too often, there’s a kind of build up of the same stuff. It’s like watching the same movie over and over again. But worse, you’re also picking up the same vibes ad nauseam.

So I rotate.

Sometimes I grow disenchanted or fatigued by the overall Catholic scene. Several times I’ve tried just staying away. But after a week or two, I’m always happy to get back.

It’s a funny thing, similar to a plant needing water, but not too much water. Too much and the plant drowns, just as being dehydrated can kill too. And if you always draw your water from the same well, the same assortment of trace pollutants could build up. So it’s better to draw your water from different wells.

Splash by MC via Flickr

Splash by HC via Flickr

Today I’m feeling slightly over-watered, so to speak, by the same type of water. Last week I did a little experiment. I went to the same parish every day. There were nice things, nice people and nice conversations. But toward the end of the week, the buildup was happening again. The same old vibes, the same old stuff. And the same texture of the Holy Spirit (for me, each parish differs that way too).

I don’t really know why I’m sharing this publicly. For years I’ve kept my private experience to myself or only shared with my intimate friends. But today I confess: I can’t be a perfectly conventional Catholic but at the same time, I can’t be without Catholicism.

Perhaps some of you can relate in your own way, in your own circles.


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A deep inner beauty


When I tell people that I like to go to catholic mass I often sense some kind of inner reservation from the other person. I’m not surprised. I know why. Or I have a pretty good idea. The Inquisitions, the child abuse, the corruption. Or maybe just the regimentation. Not to forget the sexism.

I know all about that stuff but regardless, still feel the Holy Spirit active in the Mass. Some folks give me a blank or hard look when I say that. To me, that just tells me something about where they are. Many people think they are open minded but imo are just as narrow and regimented in their thinking as any hardcore Catholic.

Myself, I just go on what I feel. And that leaves me open to a whole new vista that I didn’t even know existed, prior to recognizing the call.


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Flowers Are Beautiful, But Fragile

Sascha Hjort

From the very start the flower intuitively knows to follow the sunlight, and so it does. As it continues to grow it quickly realizes that it is a harsh environment to grow in.

Sometimes I imagine myself as a flower. Beautiful but fragile.

As the flower grows stronger, taller, it learns how to protect itself, still aiming for the sunlight.

As the years go by, more and more walls are built around the flowers core, until one day it is completely closed off from the world surrounding it. It is closed off from the sun.

Everything is now dark. The sunlight isn’t allowed to shine at the flowers core anymore, it is too risky opening up to it.

The flower remains closed for years. Hiding its own beauty and forgetting all about the sunlight. Instead of growing towards the sun the flower turns the other way, hitting the ground.

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